Japanese Prints at the Stein

Hosoda Eishi, also known as Chobunsai, was of samurai rank but abandoned his position to persue a profession in painting and printmaking. He was a member of the Kano School in Japan where he learned the fundamental elements of traditional Japanese art and design. Beginning in the fifteenth century, the Kano School was an assemblage of prolific artisans who succeeded in captivating patrons with their vast range of styles and pictorial themes. Eishi’s work shows a mastery in tradition, yet conveys a sense of tranquility and balance. Throughout many of his works there is a reoccurring interest in the Geisha lifestyle. The term Geisha, literally meaning “accomplished person,” was coined during the 17th century. These women often could be found in pleasure quarters, but were also skilled in the performing arts. In his later years, Eishi developed a style in which these standing female figures were against muted, single-color backgrounds and stylistically elongated his figures until their heads were only one-twelfth the height of their body.eishi001_main

Visions of Conflict

Public artist talk and reception with Louie Palu 
Friday, October 30, 3:30-5:00 P.M.

From October 18 – November 15, the Robert and Elaine Stein Galleries will present work by four distinguished photographers who document and create work in response to conflict and war. The exhibition “Visions of Conflict” features the photographic work of Ziyah Gafić, Louie Palu, Jessica Hines, and Larry Price, and is held as part of the CELIA conference “ACCORD: Peace, War, and the Arts.” Benjamin J. Montague, Associate Professor of Art, curated the exhibition.

Inspired by the anniversaries of the Dayton Peace Accord and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, the exhibition shares how artists have responded to their own experiences in conflict. Their images help instill empathy and ask viewers to question their own understanding of war. The photographs included in the exhibition function as more than just historical documents, but rather offer insight into the emotional and psychological consequences of battle.

Sep 05, 2008 - Garmsir District, Helmand Province, Afghanistan - U.S. Marine Cpl. Philip Pepper age 22 who is part of Alpha Company of the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) Battle Landing Team (BLT) 1/6, after riding in a convoy in Garmsir District, Helmand Province, Afghanistan at Forward Operating Base Apache North. Located in Southern Helmand Province, Garmsir has been a haven for insurgents for the last several years. Earlier this year the Marines cleared the area after a period of heavy fighting. Philip is from Tallahasse FL and has done two tours of Iraq in addition to this tour. (Credit Image: © Louie Palu/ZUMA Press)

Sep 05, 2008 – Garmsir District, Helmand Province, Afghanistan – U.S. Marine Cpl. Philip Pepper age 22 who is part of Alpha Company of the 24th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) Battle Landing Team (BLT) 1/6, after riding in a convoy in Garmsir District, Helmand Province, Afghanistan at Forward Operating Base Apache North. Located in Southern Helmand Province, Garmsir has been a haven for insurgents for the last several years. Earlier this year the Marines cleared the area after a period of heavy fighting. Philip is from Tallahasse FL and has done two tours of Iraq in addition to this tour.
(Credit Image: © Louie Palu/ZUMA Press)

Visions of Conflict

Public artist talk and opening reception with Ziyah Gafić: Sunday, October 18, 2:30-5:30 P.M.

From October 18 – November 15, the Robert and Elaine Stein Galleries will present work by four distinguished photographers who document and create work in response to conflict and war. The exhibition “Visions of Conflict” features the photographic work of Ziyah Gafić, Louie Palu, Jessica Hines, and Larry Price, and is held as part of the CELIA conference “ACCORD: Peace, War, and the Arts.” Benjamin J. Montague, Associate Professor of Art, curated the exhibition.

Ziyah Gafić will be speaking to the public about his photography on Oct. 18th at 2:30.

Inspired by the anniversaries of the Dayton Peace Accord and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, the exhibition shares how artists have responded to their own experiences in conflict. Their images help instill empathy and ask viewers to question their own understanding of war. The photographs included in the exhibition function as more than just historical documents, but rather offer insight into the emotional and psychological consequences of battle.

Personal belongings recovered from mass graves lie on a forensic table in Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina, April 26, 2010. These are items people carried with them as they either fled from the Serb Army, or when they were taken for execution. Personal belongings are still being recovered from countless mass graves across Bosnia and Herzegovina and are used as evidence in ongoing trials for war crimes and in the ongoing identification process of their owners.

Personal belongings recovered from mass graves lie on a forensic table in Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina, April 26, 2010. These are items people carried with them as they either fled from the Serb Army, or when they were taken for execution. Personal belongings are still being recovered from countless mass graves across Bosnia and Herzegovina and are used as evidence in ongoing trials for war crimes and in the ongoing identification process of their owners.

Photo by Ziyah Gafić

Don’t miss a visit from Deborah Kahn!

Deborah Kahn: Paintings and Drawings

Join us here at the Robert and Elaine Stein Galleries to celebrate the Deborah Kahn: Paintings and Drawings Exhibition by coming to the artist talk on Sunday September 13th. The exhibition features Washington, D.C.
artist Deborah Kahn and her elegantly composed figurative abstractions. Deborah Kahn herself will be presenting to the public on her work and what it represents. Of her work, Kahn says “I believe that art, like emotion, contains coexisting contradictions. My paintings are an attempt to make this idea concrete…Painting for me is a controlled connection to an inner world.”

This is a free event with a reception to follow Ms. Kahn’s lecture.

debrah kahn

Ms. Kahn’s lecture begins at 2:30pm in the WSU Creative Arts Center and the reception will last until 5:30pm in the Robert and Elaine Stein Galleries.

We hope to see you there!

Fayelee Conley
Graduate Assistant
Robert and Elaine Stein Galleries
artgalleries@wright.edu

Support the Permanent Collection

Here at the Robert and Elaine Stein Galleries we have on display many exciting works of art from our permanent collection, but I would like to specifically highlight one piece titled Support, 1973 by Robert Rauschenberg. Support is a screenprint on paper that represents the support that was given to Managua, the capital of Nicuragua during the 1972 earthquake that devastated the city. This piece serves as a beacon of hope for the disasters that have occurred both in the past and in this decade through the use of its light colors and intriguing images that also portray a sense of positivity and lightness. It will be on display now until October 4th. Come to our lower gallery and pause in front of Support to remind yourself of the support you have received and have given in your life.

                                                               Support-by-Robert-Rauschenberg

Fayelee Conley
Graduate Assistant
Robert and Elaine Stein Galleries

5 Reasons Not To Miss The Opening Reception For Shiao-Ping Wang And Brian Chu’s Recent Paintings

“Drumming” (acrylic on canvas) by Shiao-Ping Wang

“Drumming” (acrylic on canvas) by Shiao-Ping Wang

by Adam Pearson

Married painters, Brian Chu and Shiao-Ping Wang will be giving an informal gallery talk on Jan. 18, at 3 p.m. in the galleries in the Creative Arts Center, with a reception following from 4 to 5:30 p.m. But why go? Here’s a few reasons.


1.
They are likely the most interesting people you will meet this week

As a couple of new immigrants from Taiwan, Brian Chu and Shiao-Ping Wang spent their formative years in New York from 1981 to 2000.  They both studied at Queens College under renowned teachers such as Gabriel Laderman, Louis Finkelstein and Rosemarie Beck. Needless to say, they’ve been a part of the art community for a long time. Rather than rest on their laurels though, they continue to explore new ideas through their paintings.

2. Two unique styles

Though Shiao-Ping Wang and Brian Chu were both trained as representational painters and had the same training, they each branched out to develop very distinct styles. Shiao-Ping Wang’s abstract work uses patterns and shapes to reveal meanings behind cultures and traditions, while Brian Chu paints often shrouded physical objects in ways that often allow for ambiguous interpretation. This exhibit serves as an overview for the unique development of each artist.

3. They have a lot to say to young artists

Both artists were in their late twenties before they even began their art education. Most young people think they must be firmly established by then, these artists say that is not the case. With years of experience under their belt, they aren’t just looking for students to ask them about their work, they want to you to ask them about how to overcome your own obstacles in establishing yourself as an artist.

 4. Last chance to see the galleries before it moves to a new location.

Stein Galleries is moving to a new location (more details on that to come), and this will be one of their last exhibits in the Creative Arts Center. So come on by while we’re still nearby!

5. It’s free and open to the public

For more information, click here.

MATERIALIZE EXHIBIT – Caribou Conflict

from David Von Ness (2010)

by Adam Pearson

This 3D printed piece by David Von Ness shows two caribou pushing a sphere made of their intertwining antlers towards each other. As these caribou are connected to the object they are trying to push, facing towards each other, this is a conflict neither can win and can’t be resolved. Could this sculpture be some sort of metaphor for a struggle that results in stasis? Or is it simply a cool design meant for nothing more than to show off the potential of digital fabrication?

This is just one of many digitally fabricated sculptures positing this question in Materialize, the newest Robert & Elaine Stein Galleries’ exhibit open now at Wright State Creative Arts Center, room 252.